Are you where you thought you would be?

447px-revolutionary_joyce_better_contrastRevolutionary Joyce, Cornell University Joyce Collection

              Our 9/30 planning group (with members of the core planning committee and the Dissertation and Citation working groups) discussed the form and content of the upcoming visit by Dr. Amanda Visconti, creator of InfiniteUlysses, a participatory digital edition of James Joyce’s masterwork. Our symposium format is inspired by the flipped classroom structure (in which lecture and homework are flipped so that in-class time is devoted to projects and discussions). Rather than asking Dr. Visconti to give a lecture, we’ve asked her to talk with us about the implications of her work, and about the extent to which it can serve as a model as we re-imagine graduate education with a focus on writing, DH training, and career flexibility. With these topics in mind, the planning group composed questions for Dr. Visconti. The questions included:

What was exceptional about your experience as a graduate student? What could or could not be translated for a different institution?

What was the relationship between your comprehensive exam and your innovative dissertation?

Are you where you thought you would be when you began graduate school?

What is the harshest criticism your work has received?

Do you have questions you’d like to ask Dr. Visconti? Please ask them during her visit (see event dates and times in our list of upcoming events) or submit them to judith-pascoe@uiowa.edu

Next Gen PhD planners, creators, and friends: check out Dr. Visconti’s research blog, which includes advice on doing digital work as a humanities graduate student, her dissertation defense talk, and a DH job talk.

One thought on “Are you where you thought you would be?”

  1. Kevin Birmingham recently gave his Truman Capote Award acceptance speech at the University of Iowa for his book on James Joyce’s Ulysses. The speech, linked below, is a powerful commentary on literary criticism and on where our PhD students, at least in English, want to be and where they end up.

    http://www.kevinbirmingham.net/research/

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